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Daniel Moult Review

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DANIEL MOULT ORGAN CONCERT
Aylesbury Methodist Church: 18th May 2016.

On an otherwise damp Wednesday evening in May, Buckingham Street reverberated to the brilliance of Daniel Moult, a fine young Concert Organist who within just a few years has consolidated his outstanding reputation throughout Europe and Australia. During the evening, Daniel enraptured his large audience with phenomenal performance supported by genial commentary. He presented an imaginative programme planned to appeal to all musical tastes. Nothing was too remote and nothing banal.

Bravely he commenced with a thrilling Widor showpiece. Not the well known and often repeated 5th Symphony Toccata, but the far more exciting Allegro to the 6th Symphony. Continuing via a short gentle 'Elevation' by Saint-Saens, Daniel then performed the famous Fantasia in F by Mozart, but he first provided an interesting explanation of how this was first written for a barrel organ in a waxwork museum with Masonic and military connections! Following a delightful trio by J S Bach, Daniel concluded with his own arrangements of three pieces from Handel's Water Music including the famous 'Hornpipe'.

After an interval for refreshments and chatter, Daniel commenced the second half of his programme with a Vierne tour de force, calling for dexterous hand work above a famous French fireman's march, markedly sounded on the pedals. By contrast Daniel then played Saint-Saens 'The Swan', reminding us how it became famous via a former Dulux advert and is now incessantly repeated on 'Classic FM'. After the short 'Suite Carmelite', organ music written for a film, he performed Nigel Ogden's joyful 'Penguins' Playtime', clearly appreciated by the enthused audience! As his 'pièce de résistance 'Daniel concluded with an organ showpiece, Gershwin's 'I got rhythm' arranged as a set of variations by Eliot Britton. With its intricate hand play and double footwork, only the bravest of virtuoso organists would dare to tackle the virtual technical impossibilities of this otherwise engaging masterpiece, but Daniel's playing expressed sheer enjoyment making it look and sound easy!

The audience were enthralled throughout. The unceasing applause brought Daniel back for an encore and continuing afterwards until he could return no more!

This, the 31st annual event was performed on our unique custom built digital organ, continuing its tradition featuring top rank organists who not only excel in performance, but have the ability to engage their audiences from beginning to end. Those who were able to attend were treated to an unforgettable musical experience. Daniel Moult truly proved his reputation as 'one of the finest organists of our time'.

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